Aetheria, Death, Beauty and Masquerades: Three exhibits revealed at ART on 5th

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“Masquerade Series – The Void” created by Chris Guarino. {Photo by Nicolette Mallow}.

June 2016—ART on 5th revealed three exhibitions by artists Brandon Snow, John Breiner and Chris Guarino. Each artist creates a unique style from the heart. However, Brandon Snow’s pieces can be recognized by his bold use of the colors black and red, butterflies, roses, matches and a balloon. The works of John Breiner are a bit more playful and extensive with bright colors, including images like an eagle, a Native American and an owl. The collection by Chris Guarino reflects a fantasy world of magic, darkness, nature and masks. All three exhibitions and all three artists displayed by the gallery are listed below in fuller details.

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  • “Life, Death, and Beauty”: The strength of Brandon Snow’s work stems from the simplicity of his imagery. Each piece is conceptualized by photographing an everyday object. These are then translated from film to canvas via a large-format silkscreen printing method which he has developed through years of experimentation. This will be the artist’s first solo exhibition in Austin. “Brandon Snow is an Austin-based self-taught artist. Out of a desire to infuse his work with a new type of energy and excitement, Brandon began merging lo-fi film photography and silkscreen printing. When Snow discovered that he could print his photographs using large format silk screens, he immediately began the tedious process of teaching himself through trial and error. This silk screen method also allows room for unique and unplanned characteristics to develop in each piece during its creation”. Snow’s works are on display until July 7, 2016. www.brandonsnowart.com
  • “Aetheria”: John Breiner’s work revolves around the reuse of found paper, including book covers and old maps. By utilizing a unique print transfer method, Breiner combines photographs and original drawings. He finishes the image with a myriad of techniques, including acrylic, spray paint, and collage. The result is an ephemeral surface which transcends traditional print media. John Breiner is from New York, and this will be his second exhibition at ART on 5th. “John Breiner’s love of the ephemeral surface has kept him painting and illustrating for close to two decades. While the focus of his personal work revolves around the reuse of found items (specifically old paper, books and book jackets), John has also painted large-scale murals, numerous illustrations, and album covers over the years”. Briener’s works are on display until July 7, 2016. www.johnbreiner.com
  • “From The Unknown & The Masquerade Series”: Chris Guarino, the winner of our 2015 Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series Contest, is currently the featured artist at ART on 5th. Guarino’s sculptures and digital photography are no longer on display. For information about prints, please contact ART on 5th. “From the Unknown is a solo exhibition of work by internationally recognized sculptor and digital media artist, Chris Guarino. Chris was also the winner of our 2015 Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series Contest. His work has been exhibited in Chicago, Miami, and Berlin. This show will feature original cast resin sculptures as well as prints of his digital photography work.” “From the Unknown” ended on June 18, 2016. Viewers can still see artwork by Chris Guarino at the gallery, however the full exhibit is no longer up in its original form. www.chrisguarino.com

Additionally, please bear in mind that ART on 5th is encouraging a Call for Entries from artists that have yet to be featured at the gallery. “ART on 5th will once again be hosting the Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series. The Artisan Series is a national search to find the next big name in visual arts, and offers under represented artists a national platform to showcase their work. Artists residing within 150 miles of the city center will be considered for the Austin semi-finalist exhibition to be held at ART on 5th this October”. For more information regarding hours, location or upcoming exhibits at the gallery of ART on 5th: please visit their website at www.arton5th.com or call (512) 481-1111.

 Note: This article was originally published on Examiner.com in June 2016.  

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‘Natalie Frank: The Brothers Grimm’ exhibition on display at The Blanton Museum of Art

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“Six Swans III” – Drawing by Natalie Frank. (Photography by Nicolette Mallow.)

Natalie Frank: The Brother’s Grimm is a current exhibition hosted by The Blanton Museum of Art at The University of Texas at Austin. Located within five different rooms that are all interconnected, the gallery is adorned with dozens of gouache and pastel drawings showcasing Frank’s hypnotizing and graphic fairy tale art. Make no mistake; the Brother’s Grimm fairy tales are not reflective of the typical happily-ever-after stories that modern authors portray to our children today. Originally, these fairy tales were written for adults, not adolescents. Therefore, stand warned that Frank’s exquisite drawings are not necessarily child-friendly. Viewers with kids are advised to take a stroll before taking their children through the gallery.

“Looky, look, look at the shoe that she took. There’s blood all over, and the shoe’s too small. She’s not the bride you met at the ball,” (Grimm’s Fairy Tales).

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This fairy tale exhibition is a collection of otherworldly, unforgettable stories written hundreds of years ago. Magical, dark, haunting and spellbinding. The illustrations tell the Brother’s Grimm stories of love, lust, death, tragedy and historical folklore. During an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Frank explains how she “delved deeper into the early, unsanitized editions, she saw why so many of the brothers’ story plots contained brutal violence and elements of shape-shifting magic: Their folk tales were actually being told and retold by women who had to navigate a 19th-century social and political world wherein they held almost no power over their fates. Marriages were typically arranged; death during childbirth was common. Suddenly, the princesses, hags and witches in the Grimm’s’ fairy tales felt grounded and complex to Ms. Frank, and she started making drawings that could reflect these characters’ vulnerabilities and strengths.”

Blood, castles, animals, metamorphosis, nudity, genitalia, nature and the supernatural can all be found in the artwork. The use of imagination within Natalie Frank: The Brothers Grimm is striking, unique, scary and mesmerizing. The imagery is very intense, such as Frank’s drawing “Brier Rose” depicting a woman that almost seems to be drugged or half conscious, missing clothing and unable to resist any advances. A beautiful woman whose story entails a spell-induced, one hundred sleep caused by an evil witch. A young woman whose masked and blindfolded in a blood red veil as a half-man and half-beast creature weighs down upon her as if to approach her in a sexual manner.

These are not images one can easily forget.

Entranced by the images in the artwork, walking through the gallery lures viewers to step out of modern time for a while. To think these stories were told centuries ago, it’s fascinating and a bit disturbing. Frank’s storybook illustrations are also absolutely booming with bold and powerful colors that lighten the heaviness of the stories. The colors are so playful and bright like a children’s room, and yet the symbolism is so dark and grim. The gallery includes almost 20 stories, including the following: Snow White, Brier Rose, The Frog King, Rapunzel, The Juniper Tree, Endpaper, The Devil with The Three Golden Hairs, and Six Swans.

According to The Blanton Museum of Art, “Natalie Frank: The Brothers Grimm, is an exhibition of more than 30 gouache and pastel drawings by artist Natalie Frank, a New York-based Austin native. Organized by The Drawing Center in New York, this presentation explores the nineteenth-century fairy tales of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm. Drawing upon the history of illustrated books, figuration, and personal and political narrative, Frank’s drawings represent the largest collection of Grimm’s fairy tales ever illustrated by a fine artist.”

The exhibition will be featured at The Blanton Museum of Art at The University of Texas at Austin until November 15, 2015. The Blanton Museum of Art is a remarkable university museum full of natural light, tall ceilings, blue tiling, installation pieces, statues and grand stairwells that facilitate the galleries. Over 17,000 works of art have become part of their permanent collection. However, due to the fact this particular gallery in the museum has no windows and flash photography is prohibited: It is strongly advised to visit the exhibition (and Natalie Frank’s website) in order to see her drawings in all their splendor and vivacity. Be sure to also check out storyteller Tom Lee on October 15, 2015 at 6:30 PM at The Blanton Museum of Art to perform selected stories from Frank’s illustrations. For more information regarding the exhibition, the museum or the artist, please visit www.natalie-frank.com or www.blantonmuseum.org.

“Mirror, mirror on the wall, who in this realm is the fairest of them all? … You, my queen, may have a beauty quite rare, but Snow White is a thousand times more fair,” (Grimm’s Fairy Tales).

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“Brier Rose III” – Drawing by Natalie Frank. (Photography by Nicolette Mallow.)

Note: This article was originally published on Examiner.com in August 2015.