Salvador Dalí gallery at ART on 5th reaches its closing week

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“Mad Tea Party” by Salvador Dalí. Photography provided by ART on 5th gallery.

Prints by Salvador Dalí will be on display for only a few more days at ART on 5th in Austin, Texas. Also known as Ao5, evident within this art gallery are colorful butterflies, portraits, eroticism, symbolism and storytelling, as well as the notorious melting clocks that Salvador Dalí is well known for. All original copies, The Salvador Dalí art exhibition entails many printmaking pieces, too. Printmaking is a significant and unique form of art that launched in the 1400’s. And the last day to see this timeless exhibit of prints is Saturday, March 12, 2016.

Born in Spain the year of 1904, Salvador Dalí is an artist of the 20th century whom was talented in many art forms that included the following: painting, illustrations, sculpture, fashion, photography, writing, architecture and film. Known greatly for his work revolving around surrealism, Dalí’s artwork is captivating and haunting, unforgettable; a kaleidoscope of colors. A master of his craft, he tantalized, hypnotized and sometimes horrified the world with his powerful, one-of-a-kind artwork. After an extensive career of great publicity and artistic beauty: Salvador Dalí died of heart failure at the age of 84. Thankfully, the memory of his artistic legacy is immortal and will live on forever.

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ART on 5th released a final promotion to inform locals in Austin, Texas that this is the last week to see the exhibition, “ART on 5th will be hosting a stunning exhibition of over 50 authenticated Salvador Dalí prints until March 12, 2016. The work spans three decades of the artist’s career, from the 1950’s – 1970’s, and includes a sampling of images from 6 different series by this artist. Owned by a private art collector in the northeast, this gallery is part of a larger collection of Dalí prints. Dalí worked in series and we have images from a wide variety of his series, including “Memories of Surrealism”, “Les Diners de Gala”, “Biblia Sacra”, “The Twelve Apostles”, “The Divine Comedy” and many others. One particularly interesting series is the 1973 “Les Caprices de Goya”, which Salvador Dalí created by printing over—adding color and new image details to the original series “Los Caprichos”, by 18th century Spanish artist Francisco Goya. As a result, each of these pieces bear the signature of both artists. There is a helpful description of “Les Caprices de Goya” online. Another interesting fact to note about the work: many of the pieces from the “Divine Comedy” series are deconstructions, which means they are sort of artists proofs that may have been used to test plates or colors before doing the entire edition. For instance, we have one on display called “Dante Purified” which only has the pink and the blue inks from the image are printed. It is an incomplete version of the image as it was released in the final publication of the edition.”

Located on 3005 South Lamar, admission to the gallery at ART on 5th is free of cost. For more information regarding ART on 5th and their hours of operation, please call 512-481-1111 or visit their website at www.arton5th.com

To explore more about this artist, please visit Artsy’s Salvador Dalí page which provides visitors with Dalí’s bio, over 1300 of his works, exclusive articles, and up-to-date Dalí exhibition listings. A current exhibition is featured at The Royal Academy of Arts in London from 7 October 2017 — 3 January 2018. 

 Note: This article was originally published on Examiner.com in March 2016. 

Gabriel Garcia Marquez is immortalized by The University of Texas at Austin

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Pasaporte de Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1969-1976. Photography by Nicolette Mallow.

The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin has become a safe haven of archives in honor of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. A magical realism writer that created words of mysticism, beauty, love and tragedy; Marquez, also known as Gabo, had an eternal voice that was so unique it created its own genre of writing. Marquez takes readers to another dimension within reality, like magic, and he is able to evoke heartfelt emotions that linger like the smell of fine perfume in the air, or tender kiss on the skin.

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According to the Harry Ransom Center, “More than 75 boxes of documents constitute the archive of the Colombian-born author, journalist, screenwriter and key figure in Latin American history and politics. Researchers will have access to manuscript drafts of published and unpublished works, correspondence, 43 photograph albums, 22 scrapbooks, research material, notebooks, newspaper clippings, screenplays and ephemera.”

Also on display within the library and museum are a few glass encasings for viewers to admire entailing the following artifacts: Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s passport, edited transcripts, his Nobel Prize acceptance speech, a letter to US President Jimmy Carter, and edited chapters of his book. Within one of the display cases on the first floor, guests can regard the Smith-Corona 250 typewriter that Marquez used to write so many of his stories. To imagine his hands working on all those keys. Touching all those keys thousands upon thousands of times as he wrote stories that would fill the world with magic. It was a remarkable experience to see the typewriter that he used to write. And it was a delight to see his handwriting in Spanish amongst all the edited transcripts, letters and chapters of his books.

Born the year of 1927 in Colombia, last year in 2014 Gabriel Garcia Marquez died of pneumonia in Mexico City. A great artist was lost that day. The New York Times ran an article soon after the writer passed in 2014 that read, “Mr. García Márquez, who received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982, wrote fiction rooted in a mythical Latin American landscape of his own creation, but his appeal was universal. His books were translated into dozens of languages. He was among a select roster of canonical writers — Dickens, Tolstoy and Hemingway among them — who were embraced both by critics and by a mass audience. Mr. García Márquez was a master of the literary genre known as magical realism, in which the miraculous and the real converge. In his novels and stories, storms rage for years, flowers drift from the skies, tyrants survive for centuries, priests levitate and corpses fail to decompose. And, more plausibly, lovers rekindle their passion after a half-century apart.”

In order to view the archives in the reading room, guests make partake in an online orientation video before requesting an appointment to visit. The display cases will be open to the public until November 11, 2015. For more information about the archives, the display cases or The Harry Ransom Center: please visit their website at http://www.hrc.utexas.edu.

“Así termino pensando en él como nunca se hubiera imaginado que se podía pensar en alguien, presintiéndolo donde no estaba, deseándolo donde no podía estar, despertando de pronto con la sensación física de que él la contemplaba en la oscuridad mientras dormía, de modo que la tarde en que sintió sus pasos resueltos sobre el reguero de hojas amarillas en el parquecito, le costó trabajo creer que no fuera burla de su fantasía.” – Gabriel Garcia Marquez (El Amor En Los Tiempos Del Colera).

“And so she thought about him as she never could have imagined thinking about anyone, having premonitions that he would be where he was not, wanting him to be where he could not be, awakening with a start, with the physical sensation that he was looking at her in the darkness while she slept, so that on the afternoon when she heard his resolute steps on the yellow leaves in the little park it was difficult for her not to think this was yet another trick of her imagination.” – Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Love in the Time of Cholera).

Note: This article was originally published on Examiner.com in November 2015.